Tuned In To Music

Reflections from a lifetime

Review: Crowded House, Intriguer

It’s interesting to watch what happens with popular musicians as they age.  Some disappear after their time of stardom and then reappear and do dinosaur tours when their demographic hits the nostalgia stage (any number of hair metal bands).  Some stay in the spotlight ridiculously pretending they’re still 20 years old (Mick Jagger).  Some come out of retirement and humiliate themselves with embarrassing Super Bowl shows that are all about the money-grab (The Who).  And some, like Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan and many jazz musicians, continue to make vibrant music that grows increasingly rich and deep with age.  Neil Finn and Crowded House fall into this last group.

At one time it didn’t look like it would turn out this way.  Crowded House officially ended their career with an extraordinary live concert at Sydney’s Opera House in 1996 which is captured on the terrific live album Farewell to the World which was also separately released as a DVD.  Nine years later Paul Hester, the band’s drummer,  took his own life after years of battling depression.  In 2007 a new album, Time on Earth, was released under the Crowded House name.  The newly formulated group combined original members Neil Finn (guitars, piano, vocals), Mark Hart (guitars, keyboards, vocals), and Nick Seymour (bass, vocals) with Matt Sherrod (drums, vocals).  Most of the tracks on Time on Earth were originally intended for a Neil Finn solo CD and the album was drenched in Finn and the surviving band members coming to grips with the loss of Hester.  It could easily have been the final goodbye.

But it wasn’t.  Intriguer is a full blown Crowded House album made by a complete band making their own music and it’s very, very good.  Crowded House were always known for Finn’s exceptional song-writing skills.  The good news is that he hasn’t lost any of it.  The better news is that his personal maturity has produced lyrical maturity rather than desperate grasping for youth.  Finn’s songs are matched every step of the way by the band’s musicianship and elegant vocal work.  As a quartet, Crowded House play and sing together like the consummate professionals they are.  No grand standing, no ego trips, just well-crafted songs beautifully played and sang.

Intriguer comes with a DVD that contains a video for “Saturday Sun”, 8 tracks recorded more or less live (it looks like different takes were expertly combined) at the band’s studio in New Zealand, and two tracks recorded live at the Auckland Townhall which contains an amazing pipe organ.  The version of “Don’t Dream It’s Over” at the Townhall is not to be missed.

When I saw that Crowded House had a new release scheduled for July I was both excited and worried.  Excited because I really like the band; worried because so many bands come back with shitty albums hoping to suck cash out of the accounts of fans who want to pretend they’re still as cool as they think they were back in the day.  When I first heard Intriguer it sounded good but first impressions of CDs can, and often do, change.  They changed for Intriguer – after many listens I like it more than I did at the start.  It’s a grower.  If you’re new to Crowded House, Intriguer is as good a place to start as any. Long time fans of the band are going to thoroughly enjoy this album.  The band they loved is back and just as good, if not better, than ever.  Crowded House isn’t trying to recapture the past, they’re playing music that lives and breathes right here, right now.

Picking a couple of songs from Intriguer is impossible.  Here are two, it could have easily been any one of a half-dozed others.

“Twice if You’re Lucky”

“Elephants”


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08/15/2010 Posted by | CD reviews, music, music reviews | , , , , , | Leave a comment